Microsoft Office for iOS, Windows and OneDrive… A Winning Combination for Students and Casual Users!

This post is going to discuss the Microsoft (MS) Office suite of programmes which are freely available on iOS; I will also briefly mention MS Office for Windows. I should point out, this post will only provide a broad overview of the MS Office offerings on iOS, and it will not provide an in-depth review of each programme. This is for two primary reasons:
1. Currently, I am only using MS Office in a casual sense, so I wouldn’t be familiar with long-term use experiences.
2. A much longer post would be required to cover MS Office in its entirety, and due to the previous statement I’m unable to write such a post.
Nevertheless, this post should provide you with a significant introduction to each programme, and you can investigate areas of particular interest to you further.
I should mention, MS Office is available on Mac, but I can’t vouch for its accessibility with VoiceOver (VO).
Even though I love iOS and Mac OS, I am primarily a Windows user when it comes to productivity. While I couldn’t take advantage of the iOS versions of Ms Office when I was in college/university, I honestly believe that using MS Office on iOS, Windows and OneDrive together is a winning combination for students and/or general users.

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Recording on iOS Using SimpleMic… 100% VoiceOver Accessible Audio Recorder!

For the inaugural post in the Accessible iOS App category, I would like to focus on an app called SimpleMic. This app is a free voice and/or sound recorder for iOS Devices and it has been designed with accessibility in mind. In my opinion, it is such design considerations which set SimpleMic apart from all other recorders available in the app store, and the built-in recorder on iOS.
As elements of SimpleMic operate differently in comparison to other iOS apps, I wanted to post some additional information regarding the app’s layout, operation and possible uses. Also, I think the developer of SimpleMic (Nick Bonatsakis) has done wonderful work in this case, and it is worth while keeping an eye on his future projects. Obviously no pun intended.

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Planes, Trains and Automobiles… Accessible Travel!

As I have recently returned from my summer holiday, I thought it would be beneficial to write a post which focuses on accessible travel. This may seem unrelated to education, but more and more programmes of study are including a study trip as part of the course requirements. For example, my Masters included an international study trip to Toulouse in France which took place at the end of the 2nd semester. I feel it is important to organize any additional supports you may require ahead of time. Furthermore, from my experience, you should try and be as specific as you can when requesting support. Also, if you are requesting the support from your college/university, double and triple check that they have the supports in place for your study trip long before your departure date. I have been lucky enough to travel to the United States, the United Kingdom, Spain, Italy and France. In all destinations I have travelled to, each have been accessible to a greater or lesser extent. I must say, a lot of countries have supports for those with a disability already in place, and it is just a case of asking for them.

This is an image of an aircraft sourced from ClipArt in Microsoft Word.

Image of An Aircraft

Requesting Airport Assistance:
Asking for assistance at your airport of choice is pretty straight forward. When you are booking your flights, online or with a travel agent, you can specify that you require additional assistance when you are at the airport. This assistance can take different forms. For example, you can get someone to accompany you from the check-in desk to the boarding gate, or you can be guided directly from the desk to the airplane’s door. Additionally, you can request to be transported to the boarding gate or aircraft door in a wheelchair. In the case of opting for a wheelchair, you are whisked through the airport by a member of staff, and I think it is a very efficient assistance for someone with mobility difficulties; like myself. From my experience the support you request at your departing airport is mirrored in the destination airport automatically. However, if you would like to double check this with the cabin crew, I’m sure they would be happy to check for you. If you find it difficult to request the required support at the time of booking, you can always mention it at the check-in desk and the staff member you speak to can help you with the required assistance. Also, if you do get assistance to the boarding gate or airplane door, don’t be offended if you are told you must be the last person to board. The airport staff are not being difficult, there is a health and safety policy concerning airplanes refueling and persons with a disability boarding. To find out more about the accessibility of Dublin Airport, you can visit this link.

Requesting Rail Assistance:
I should say that I have never requested assistance on rail ahead of time, but it is possible to do so. To request support before you travel, you should make contact with your local station and they will be happy to help. When travelling via rail, I have been assisted by members of staff at the station (i.e. linking me off the train into the station), and ramps have been put in place to help me get on and off the train. Some stations are bigger than others, so it is very important to plan ahead and make sure that the supports you need are in place at the time of travel. More information regarding the accessibility of Irish Rail can be found at this link.

Requesting Accommodation Assistance:
By accommodation assistance, I mean accessible accommodation. In my experience, hotels are normally most likely to have a room which is accessible. Such rooms in a hotel are usually called Disabled Access Rooms, and they are generally large with a bathroom which can accommodate a wheelchair. It is best to specify whether you would like an accessible hotel room or not. I would strongly recommend that you double and triple check that you have been given an accessible room when you are checking in. It is very common that hotel rooms are mixed up all the time regardless of the existence of a disability. For example, on my most recent hotel stay, I was given a room which was not at all accessible in any way. After requesting the room which I originally booked, I was changed to the correct room. To get an idea of what can be provided by an accessible hotel, visit this link to the Crown Plaza Dublin.

Requesting Transfer Assistance:
A transfer is generally the term applied to transport from an airport/train station to your accommodation. I should say I have only used transfers which were not necessary accessible, but they did meet my needs at the time. If you are booking a package holiday via a travel agent or tour operator, you will have someone with whom you can discuss your transport options. If you have booked your air/rail and accommodation separately, you should conduct a little research regarding the transportation options available to you. The accessibility of transport options will vary from destination to destination, but there is generally a varied selection of taxis, buses and trains present at and/or around the airport. There will be an information desk at the airport you are travelling to, and they should be able to help you with your transport requirements. Also, it may be possible to arrange transport through your hotel/accommodation directly.

I hope the above information is of some benefit to you, and if you have any questions please get in touch

I believe Holiday by Madonna is the song which best suits the subject matter of this post.

Academic Writing and Referencing While Using Assistive Technology… It Can Be Done!

This post will consider the topics academic writing and referencing, and how assistive technology can be used while conducting the afore mentioned activities. Similar to academic research, it is inevitable that you will be required to compose an academic piece of writing which is referenced correctly when you are in college/university. Academic writing is a different type of writing which is quite different to your normal writing style. For example, when writing an academic piece, you cannot use any personal pronouns such as “me”, “I”, or “you”. Referencing is a process where you tell the reader where you have sourced the information you are writing about. However, referencing is not just a case of stating “I found the above information in my core textbook”. There is a specific format in which references should appear, and each college/university has a slightly different approach to the referencing process. Much like my previous post, the following information is written assuming you understand the terms academic writing and referencing.

This is an image of a book regarding referencing sourced from Microsoft Word's Clip Art.

Image of Referencing Book

EndNote Referencing Software/iOS App:
In my opinion EndNote is essential for any student completing any form of academic writing which requires referencing. EndNote will manage the references you have used in your written piece, and help you to create a correctly formatted bibliography. A bibliography is an expanded version of the initial reference included in your text. EndNote is available on the web, a Windows and Mac application and an iOS app. I have successfully used the web and iOS versions of EndNote. I installed the Windows version too, but it wasn’t immediately accessible, and I didn’t have time to investigate the application further. EndNote is at its best when you are importing references generated from Google Scholar and other databases as discussed previously. The staff of your college/university library will offer training on the EndNote software. While this training will probably not focus on how the software is used in conjunction with assistive technology, it is paramount that you understand how the software works. Once you have an understanding of EndNote, you can figure out how you can access its features using your assistive technology of choice.

A Good Thesaurus:
I would recommend the use of a good thesaurus for both students using assistive technology and for those who are not. When you are trying to paraphrase something you have read regarding your research interest, it can be difficult to find a word which has the same meaning, but can say the same thing with fewer words. There is a built-in thesaurus in Microsoft Word which is completely accessible with JAWS, and I’m sure it is accessible with the majority of screen reader software available. Other word processors may also include their own thesaurus, and its functionality is likely to be the same as the one present in Microsoft Word. To use a thesaurus in a word processor, just open the thesaurus option and search for a word of your choice. For example, searching for the word “academic” finds the following results:
1. Moot
2. Theoretical
3. Abstract
4. Hypothetical
5. Speculative
6. Practical
7. Educational
You can then choose the word which is most appropriate in your situation. In Microsoft Word the thesaurus option is found in the Review section. Please note, paraphrasing is only one technique used as part of academic writing, and many more techniques are available and should be utilised. Also, it is very important that you do not overuse a thesaurus as the below video clip illustrates.

Voice Dream Writer for iOS May Help:
Voice dream writer is quite a new application specific to iOS, and it may help with your academic writing and referencing. This app is unique to iOS in that it is able to read your text sentence by sentence and paragraph by paragraph. While VoiceOver is fantastic, it does not have the afore mentioned ability to navigate text by sentence or paragraph. Voice Dream Writer can also read a sentence to you once you insert a full stop, and for faster typists this feature can be disabled. Similar to Voice Dream Reader, the major benefit of this writing application is that you can choose a custom voice to read back your text. Furthermore, if you have purchased additional voices in Voice Dream Reader, you can use them in Voice Dream Writer for no additional charge. Typing errors, punctuation use and the flow of your academic argument is much easier to assess when it is being read to you instead of reading it in your own head. As this app is quite new to iOS, I did not have an opportunity to use it for academic writing purposes.

The below paragraph is taken from my Masters, and it should give you an idea of how something should read when it is academically written and referenced correctly. While the subject matter of your assignment may be different, the referencing and phrasing should be somewhat similar.

2.1 Definitions of Social Media
In the literature there is congruence regarding the definition of SM. However, it should be noted that definitions often vary in technical complexity according to their source and context. Nash (2009) defines SM as the sites or online tools which enable individuals to interact with one another and allow the posting of materials they have created online. Kietzmann et al (2011, p.241) builds on this definition by stating that SM are sites which:
“Employ mobile and web-based technologies to create highly interactive platforms via which individuals and communities share, co-create, discuss, and modify user-generated content.” (Kietzmann et al 2011, p.241)
Kaplan and Haenlein (2010) suggest that SM consists of collaborative projects (e.g. Wikipedia), blogs (e.g. WordPress), content communities (e.g. SlideShare), social networking sites (e.g. Facebook), virtual game worlds (e.g. World of Warcraft), and virtual social worlds (e.g. Second Life).

You may have noticed this post is shorter than the previous post on academic research, and that reflects the importance of getting the academic research right before beginning the writing and referencing stages.

As always, I hope the above information is of some benefit to you or someone you know. If there is anything you would like to ask me about, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

Funnily enough academic writing and referencing aren’t topics which appear in music a lot, so I decided to pick a song which mentions “Words” in any context. On this occasion the musical contribution is courtesy of Extreme with More Than Words.

Conducting Research While Using Assistive Technology… It IS Possible!

In this post I would like to discuss the activity of conducting research on the internet with assistive technology. Researching is an inevitable task when you are in college and/or university. Whether you are attending a class, completing an assignment or preparing for a presentation, you will need to conduct research. There is a specific process to follow when researching, and you can visit this link to find out more about the said process. Gaining access to printed materials is almost unavoidable when you are researching a given topic or subject, but using the previously discussed OCR methods should enable you to access such materials. Also, some college/university library’s offer scanning services for students, and this may be of benefit to you depending on your individual needs. I should point out, your lecturer/teacher will inform you as to how you should carryout research, and they will tell you the best sources from which reliable information can be ascertained. Therefore, this post will be written assuming that you understand the research process.

This is an image of a magnifying glass which symbolises research.

Magnifying Glass Symbolising Research

Getting the Best Search Results:
Conducting research on the internet is different to searching for things on the internet. For example, if you are given a project based on the climate within a business, and you put the word climate into your favorite search engine the results will not be what you intended to find. Whereas, if you searched for “business” AND “climate”, your results would be much more suited to your area of interest. The use of quotes before and after each word in the previous example, will tell a search engine to only return results which include the terms I have used. The use of such punctuation is explained in more detail at this link. Using the correct Search Operators, Symbols and Punctuation in your searches, can make the research process much more efficient and less time consuming.

Your New Best Friend Google Scholar:
You can think of Google Scholar as a college/university version of the normal Google Search Engine. Scholar will only return results which are related to books, journal articles and/or other research related documents. In my experience, you will not find advertisements for companies relating to your search. There are many additional tools to improve your results in scholar, but at a basic level, incorporating the above Search Operators will narrow-down your results a great deal. Again, your lecturer/teacher will tell you the best way to use Scholar for your given course, and they will tell you how to login with your college/university credentials so that you have access to more information. In general, Google Scholar is a much better way of getting reliable information in comparison to using a standard Search Engine. You can access Google Scholar by visiting this link.

Don’t Ignore Your Library’s Website:
It is more than likely that your college/university library has a website, and you should become acquainted with the way this site works and its accessibility with your assistive technology. From those that I have visited, library websites usually have an online catalogue, online journals, eBooks and a search facility. The online catalogue is normally a collection of all the books that the library has on its shelves, and you are able to search this catalogue and reserve an item if it is available. The online journals are a database of journals and journal articles, and similar to the catalogue, they can be searched. In addition, if the journal article is online, you can access it instantly, and sometimes you can save the article for offline use. I have less experience with the eBook and general search sections as I normally found what I needed in the catalogue or journals, but any member of staff in your library would be more than happy to explain such features. My lecturers often arranged presentations from the library staff in my college to explain the various features of the library website for my entire class.

Be prepared to Scan Printed Materials:
Even though it is true that a lot of material is online, there is some which is still only available in a physical printed form. Such materials may include books and journal articles which are older, but may contain information which is just as relevant as online information. Therefore, it is not advisable to ignore information which is in books and journal articles just because it isn’t online, and isn’t immediately accessible. You will need to scan the information which is offline, and use an OCR application to recognise the text present on the page. Kurzweil 1000 is the programme which I have experience with, but there are many alternatives you can choose from. There is even a mobile application called KNFB Reader, which works on the iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch. KNFB Reader is expensive, but it is very versatile and may be ideal in a library situation. You can read more about KNFB Reader at this link courtesy of Applevis.

EBSCOHost is a Brilliant Companion for Your Library Website:
EBSCOHost is an application for iOS Devices (iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch), which has a simple interface that enables you to search many of the databases linked with your library account. After you download the app you will need to visit your library’s website, open a link which is related to EBSCOHost for Mobile, and then you will be emailed a code to authorise your app for 6 months or a little longer. I have found this app to be very handy when I used it, but it is not essential when you are conducting research; so don’t worry if you do not have access to it. If you do use the app, keep in mind that there is a feature for downloading and viewing a PDF version of the article your reading. This feature is inaccessible with VoiceOver, but this is a small feature of the app and doesn’t affect its functionality. Visit this link to view EBSCOHost on the app store.

Don’t Forget About Kindle, CourseSmart and Other Sites for Accessible Books:
If you are finding it particularly difficult to scan physical books, or find books which relate to the topic you are researching, don’t forget that you can access accessible books via Kindle, CourseSmart, Audible etc. As I mentioned in my previous post, the titles which are available on the mentioned providers can vary, and you will have to search around to find the desired content. In my experience, Kindle is great for finding books regarding Research Methodology and other academic subjects which are accessible.

JAWS Research It Might Be Useful:
I have known about the Research It feature in JAWS for a long time, but I have never used it for personal use or research purposes. I would imagine that Research It is best for researching current topics which are in the news. If a lecturer/teacher requests that you research a current news topic, JAWS Research It would be an ideal place to begin your search. Research It is a feature which is only available on the JAWS screen reader, and the key command CTRL + SPACE + R will activate the Research It feature.

Bookmarks Are Great:
When I find an online article or book I am particularly interested in, I always create a Favorite or Bookmark which I can refer back to later. It is also a good idea to create Favorites or Bookmarks of your most used research databases, online journals, Google Scholar and your library’s website. This will make it very easy for you to access certain features instead of searching through the various links and headings of your library’s website. If you are using an iOS Device, I have found it beneficial to create Safari Bookmarks on your Home Screen, and store a group of Bookmarks in a Folder.

I genuinely hope that you can improve your research by using some of the mentioned resources, and if you have any further queries just get in touch.

As it can sometimes be difficult to find what you are looking for while researching, I think the song I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For by U2 is quite appropriate.

Using Assistive Technology to Read Academic and Non-Academic Books

As suggested by the title, this post will consider the number of different ways assistive technology, and general technology which is accessible, can help you to read both academic and non-academic materials. This aided reading can apply in a college or university setting, and it is equally applicable in the case of reading as a hobby and/or leisure pursuit. In terms of reading, assistive technology can benefit those with print, learning, and/or vision related disabilities. My personal experience is restricted to software that benefits those who are visually impaired and/or blind, but some of the available software includes features which are designed with multi-dimensional needs in mind. For example, an iPhone application like Voice Dream Reader (discussed below) has features which are designed with individuals who have a print and/or learning disability in mind. However, the same features are as beneficial to those who are visually impaired and/or blind.

This is an image of an academic book sourced from Microsoft Word's Clip Art.

This is an image of a book related to academia.

AudioBooks:
I first encountered audioBooks when I was a teenager in Secondary/High School, and at that stage they were available on either Cassette Tape or CD. At the time, to have a book narrated by a human voice was very useful, and for the media to be portable was great. The next time I explored audioBooks was a few years ago when I was finishing my Primary Degree. It was at this time I discovered Audible. The Audible service is essentially an online library of audioBooks which can be either purchased with money or credits. This is an example of a technology which is applicable to everybody, but is particularly of benefit to those who use audioBook’s because print material is not accessible to them. Another added bonus is that Audible have an application for your smartphone, tablet, and PC/Mac. In my experience the smartphone application is accessible on the iPhone. Audible is great, and has a wide selection of titles available for download. In my opinion, the majority of the titles available are not commonly found on college and/or university reading lists, but this might not be the case if you are part of a more literary related course. Audible is definitely worth investigating, and even if it doesn’t have books on your reading list, you can always download another audiobook which you are interested in reading.

Kindle Books:
The world of Kindle is made up of Kindle Readers and Kindle Books. Kindle Readers are tablet devices which enable you to read Kindle Books and access other Amazon services, and there is a level of accessibility `built-in, but I am unaware as to how much. Thankfully, a Kindle Reader is not necessary to read a Kindle Book. This is because a Kindle Reading application is available for smartphones, tablets, and PC’s/Mac’s. Please note, to the best of my knowledge, the applications for the PC and Mac are inaccessible. However, I can say with confidence that the iPhone and iPad applications are perfectly accessible. This means that you can browse the Kindle Book store on Amazon, and choose a book which is of interest to you. Make sure that the book has Text To Speech (TTS) enabled in the Book Features in the Product Description, and I think it is a good Idea to download a sample of your chosen book to test before purchasing. Once purchased, a copy of your Kindle Book will be delivered to your smartphone and/or tablet wirelessly, and you can begin reading the downloaded title with your device’s screen reader. I have downloaded many Kindle Books for reading as a hobby, and I have also downloaded several Kindle Books relevant to my MSC programme. In my opinion, there is a much more varied selection of books available on the Kindle Book store in comparison to Audible’s Library. Therefore, if what you want isn’t available on one service, it is worth your while checking another service provider.

CourseSmart:
CourseSmart is a web based service which makes eBooks available for students. It is another example of general technology which is accessible, but CourseSmart offer a reading interface especially for screen readers and a service to make inaccessible books accessible. I was introduced to this service in my final year of my Primary Degree, and I used the service again when I was completing my MSc programme. CourseSmart is like Kindle in that it is a digital online library, but unlike Kindle, you can only rent books on CourseSmart. The rental period for the titles I read was 1 year (365 days), and this was sufficient for me in college and university. Titles which are already accessible on CourseSmart have an interactive Table of Contents, Headings aiding navigation, Alternative Text for images and graphs and accessible Tables which can be navigated with your screen reader. From memory, I believe the site automatically detects your screen reader and you are entered into the accessible reading interface. If a title is not accessible, CourseSmart offers a Tagging Service. This service basically makes the inaccessible title accessible, and takes 2 to 3 weeks to complete. You are given access to the book while the Tagging process is underway, and while it isn’t perfect, it is better than not having access to a particular book. As the name of the service may suggest, CourseSmart has an academic focus, and you are more likely to find items on your reading list on this service. For example, I was able to source 2 to 3 items from my MSc programme’s reading list on CourseSmart.

eBooks (PDF or Doc):
I should point out my definition of an eBook is a book which is either in PDF or Doc format. eBooks are also available in an EPUB format, but I do not have knowledge of the said file format’s accessibility. My thoughts are an EPUB File must be converted before it is readable by a screen reader, but this could be an incorrect statement. So with that said, the eBooks I have used have been sourced by my college and/or university and are initially in a PDF format. As discussed in a previous post, the accessibility and ease of navigation of a PDF File is not always guaranteed, and this is where assistive technology comes in. Personally, I have used the methods described in the previously linked post to make inaccessible PDF files accessible. However, when I began my MSc programme, I was introduced to a member of the Disability Office who can make inaccessible PDF Files accessible, and convert those PDF Files to Doc Files which are sometimes easier to navigate. You should ask if your college and/or university has an individual who can perform similar duties, as it is time consuming for you to complete, and you will have more to focus on at college than converting books so that you can read them. As there is such an amount of manual conversion involved, I am not a fan of eBooks. However, my perception of eBook conversion could be skewed, and it is great to have any material available when it is required.

Voice Dream Reader:
Voice Dream Reader is my favorite iPhone application at the moment. Voice Dream, as it is titled on my iPhone, is an application similar to Kindle, but it gives you the ability to change the voice which reads your book of choice. Essentially, you are creating your very own audiobook. The application comes with a voice installed called Heather, but you are not limited to the default, there are many voices which can be purchased. The voices which are available for purchase sound very natural, and you could almost forget that it is a TTS synthesiser reading your text. By default, Voice Dream can read common Word Processing file formats and accessible PDF Files (among others). If you are willing to put in the effort, it is possible to have Voice Dream read Kindle Books you have purchased. This practice involves removing the Digital Rights Management (DRM) protection present on Kindle Books, and I am not encouraging and/or justifying the mentioned activity. If you would like to discuss Kindle Books and DRM in more detail, please contact me privately. As mentioned at the beginning of this post, Voice Dream has visual features which are of benefit to those who are not visually impaired and/or blind, but have difficulty reading. I do not have experience of the afore mentioned features due to their visual nature, but I believe they are very useful to the intended audience. As an aside, the developer of Voice Dream Reader has also created applications called Voice Dream Writer and Voice Dream Male. You can preview the available voices at this site.

I hope you now have an understanding of how assistive technology can help you to read academic and/or non-academic books, and that the above information is of benefit to you or someone you know. As always, if you have any further questions regarding the topic discussed, please do not hesitate to comment and/or contact me.

As Apple are rumoured to be launching a music streaming service today at WWDC, I thought it would be appropriate to have a musical contribution courtesy of Taylor Swift to compliment todays post. Also, who doesn’t like Taylor Swift?

Commentary: Valedictorian beats blindness to thrive

This is a great example of what can be achieved when successfully incorporating assistive technology in an educational setting.

Sandy's View

Congratulations to all the recent graduates! The following article is about Taylor Adolph, a high school graduate who is believed to be the first ever blind valedictorian at his school. As a person who is blind, I believe that stories like these demonstrate two important things.

First, if a person with vision loss has the right resources and attitude, then they can accomplish as much as everyone else. Also, if blind or visually impaired students have high expectations from those around them, there is no excuse for them not to reach their full potential.

Another important point made by this story is that students who are blind or visually impaired are perfectly capable of studying alongside their sighted peers. Today’s technologies and countless resources have made this possible for many students throughout the country.

Stay tuned for Thursday’s post, where I will talk more about the different types of school…

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The Official DigiPlace4All Launch Event!

This post will focus on the official launch of the DigiPlace4All initiative, which was held on the 28th of May 2015 in the Radisson BLU Royal hotel in Dublin. You may remember, I discussed the said initiative in a previous post, in which I stated its two core aims comprised of:
1) The sharing of information among those with a disability, educators and employers.
2) The provision of peer support for digital skills and inclusion in education and employment.
When reflecting on the day, the words that spring to mind are inclusion, interaction and empowerment.

This is an image of a meeting room sourced from the Radisson website.

This is an image of a meeting room sourced from the Radisson website.

The inclusion aspect of DigiPlace4All was first mentioned by Senator Martin Conway. In Senator Conway’s opening address, he referred to the social inclusion element which is inherent in DigiPlace4All. The site benefits from the internet’s ability to breakdown geographical boundaries, and brings people together despite their circumstances.

Therefore, those living in rural parts of Ireland, need not feel isolated or be disadvantaged in terms of receiving information concerning digital skills, education and/or employment opportunities. However, it must also be kept in mind, those who are not internet users may continue to have difficulties regarding physical isolation and the access of information.

Another aspect of inclusion which was immediately apparent to me, was the extent to which DigiPlace4All incorporates an extremely broad range of abilities and disabilities. This was partly due to the large number of organisations present at the event that represented a number of different groups. For example, some of the afore mentioned organisations included AHEAD, DeafHear and Enable Ireland among others.

The second element of DigiPlace4All demonstrated at the launch event was interaction. The event offered Digital Inclusion Champions the opportunity to meet each other and discuss the future possibilities of DigiPlace4All. In addition, Champions had a chance to meet site members, and get a sense of the general feeling regarding DigiPlace4All.

The general opinion concerning DigiPlace4All was overwhelmingly positive. All the sentiments I heard were excited about the information sharing and provision of peer support potential of the site. The launch also offered all attendees the opportunity to provide feedback regarding the existing site, and the features they would like to see included in the future.

Such feedback was provided as a result of the break-out sessions. These sessions consisted of a Digital Inclusion Champion encouraging a table of attendees to explore DigiPlace4All on their own assistive technology, or demonstrating the site in real-time and helping individuals with registration if desired. When the sessions had completed, each table was asked to provide feedback, and this encouraged further interaction.

The final element that the DigiPlace4All launch embodied was empowerment. As pointed out by one of the speakers at the event, individuals using DigiPlace4All are not limited to what someone else thinks suits their needs. The individual is free to explore a range of information present on the site, and make their own, personalised, informed decision.

The above scenario is very important as there is not a one-size fits all solution to an individual’s needs. DigiPlace4All can offer a level of empowerment to individuals they may not have experienced before, and this could in turn increase the individual’s level of independence. I believe that such empowerment, and the possibility of increased independence, can only be a good thing.

To hear some extracts from the DigiPlace4All launch event, listen to the June edition of the NCBI Technology Podcast.

This is an image of the DigiPlace4All logo sourced from a SlideShare presentation.

This is an image of the DigiPlace4All logo sourced from a SlideShare presentation.

It was mentioned that future events, in different locations, could be held in the future. However, I would imagine, this will largely depend on the popularity of DigiPlace4All, so I would encourage you to spread the word!

As mentioned above, the scope of society to which DigiPlace4All is applicable to is very broad, so the likelihood that you know someone who could benefit from the site and/or contribute to the site is very high. Feel free to use this blog post, or any of the below links, to share DigiPlace4All.

Visit the DigiPlace4All Website
Like DigiPlace4All on Facebook
Follow DigiPlace4All on Twitter

If you would like further information about DigiPlace4All, or have any comments and/or questions, please do not hesitate to contact me.

As inclusion is a large aspect of DigiPlace4All, I feel the song Absolutely Everybody by Vanessa Amorosi is quite apt

Taking Notes the Accessible Way!

This post will focus on the topic of taking notes in a lecture, tutorial and/or seminar setting. If it is your first time to take notes in any of the afore mentioned environments, chances are you will try and transcribe what the speaker is saying word for word. This is the approach I took when I first started taking notes, and I quickly realised that such a strategy was basically impossible. Also, taking down everything a speaker says is not always beneficial. For example, a good teacher/lecturer will say the same thing a number of times in different ways. If done correctly, this will not sound repetitive and there is a greater chance of reaching students who may learn differently. Therefore, taking down several variations of the same information which may not appeal to your style of learning is not going to help you. I believe a much more sensible course of action is to actively listen to what is being said, and take down the information which you can understand and learn from. Such note taking is a skill, and it may not be a skill you will acquire immediately; so don’t panic!

A possible way to reduce any anxiety regarding note taking, would be to use a voice recorder during lectures. I wouldn’t advise this as a replacement for taking notes, but it can help at the beginning if you are really worried about missing something. It is very necessary to consult your lecturer prior to using a voice recorder during lectures. In my experience, lecturers are perfectly ok with the use of a recorder, but I have been asked to make sure the recordings are only used for my use and go no further.

This is an image of an Old Typewriter sourced from Microsoft Word.

Image of an Old Typewriter sourced from Microsoft Word.

Regarding the practicalities of note taking, there are two different methods I would recommend:
1. Laptop/MacBook, Screen Reader and Word Processor of Choice.
2. iOS Device, Bluetooth Keyboard and AN Accessible Note Taking App.

Laptop/MacBook, Screen Reader and Word Processor of Choice:
I think this combination is essential for college/university anyway, and it is also a very good method for taking notes. However, it is not always the most portable solution, and it can be inconvenient in terms of making sure your battery is charged etc. Regarding Windows, my personal setup consisted of a HP/Compaq Laptop, JAWS and Microsoft Word. I do believe using NVDA and another Word Processor would work equally as well. On the Macintosh side of things, the most portable combination would be a MacBook Air, VoiceOver and TextEdit or Microsoft Word 2016. The MacBook Air is the smallest of Apple’s MacBook line-up, and the newest models have very long lasting batteries I have heard. TextEdit is the built-in Word Processor on Macintosh, and Microsoft Word 2016 is going to be released soon and will be the first version of MS Word to be accessible on the Macintosh. Please note, in my experience, the popular Pages Word Processor is largely inaccessible, and cannot be used in an effective manner for college/university.

iOS Device, Bluetooth Keyboard and AN Accessible Note Taking App:
This combination would be in addition to the mentioned Laptop/MacBook option, and I think it is a much more portable option with a longer lasting battery. I have personally used an iPad, a Keyboard Case and NoteMaster. As discussed previously, the iPad is 100% accessible, and an iPhone or iPod Touch are just as accessible. When it comes to note taking apps on the iOS device you are using, there are many choices, and it is more or less down to your own personal taste. This link will bring you to the Productivity section of Applevis’s iOS App Directory. Some of the note taking apps which are available are not 100% accessible, and I would recommend trying to get a free version to test before purchasing a full version. If you would rather not download any additional apps, the built-in Notes app is completely accessible on iOS and would be perfect for taking notes.

I really hope the above information is of help to someone taking notes, or thinking about taking notes themselves. I spent the first year of college having someone else type my notes, and it was effective, but I found I had no connection with what was being taken down. At the beginning of my second year I began taking the notes myself, and it was the best decision I made. My active listening skills kicked in, thankfully, and I felt I was much more engaged with what was going on in the lecture/tutorial/seminar.

As usual, if you have any questions and/or would like to know more, please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

I’m not sure if you are aware, but the Eurovision Song Contest was held in Austria over the weekend. This year, an artist called Mans Zelmerlow representing Sweden won. You can listen to Mans’s winning performance by playing the below video. It is a very catchy song and is a deserving winner in my opinion.

Converting to the Dark Side, in terms of File Types

As suggested by the title, this post will focus on the topic of conversion in terms of File Types. This can be a very useful process to understand and be able to carryout for a number of reasons. For example, I mentioned in a previous post, it seemed like every file I received was in an inaccessible PDF format. On that occasion, I used another piece of assistive technology to convert the PDF file into another format, but this is not always necessary. It is sometimes possible to use standard, or non-specialized, software, to perform the conversion process. I will state when any of the following Conversion Options use additional assistive technology or other software tools.

This is an image of Darth Vader from Star Wars sourced from Google Images

Image of Darth Vader from Star Wars

Converting Portable Document Format (PDF) Files:
In my experience, there are three ways in which a PDF can be converted to a Text, or other Word Processing, File that is accessible.
1. Converting with Adobe Reader.
2. Converting with Kurzweil 1000.
3. Converting on iOS (iPhone, iPad, and/or iPod Touch).

Converting within Adobe Reader:
I have found this to be useful when it is difficult to navigate an accessible PDF. In such a situation, the text is readable by the screen reader, but there are no Headings or Bookmarks to make navigation easier. To perform this conversion, I have simply navigated to the File Menu, selected Save As and chosen Text File from the available options. This will produce a file which opens in Notepad/Wordpad and can be cut and paste into another Word Processor if desired. This option does lose the formatting of the PDF, but when it makes navigation so much easier, I quickly get over the loss of formatting. It should be noted that this conversion will not work in the case of protected PDF Files.

Converting with Kurzweil 1000:
This is by far my favorite option for converting PDF Files to an accessible format. Unlike the previous option, using Kurzweil for conversion does not require the PDF to be accessible. This option does require you to have an authorized copy of Kurzweil 1000, but once you have that, converting is as easy as printing the PDF virtually. All that is required is that you follow the procedure to print the PDF (e.g. Ctrl + P), and choose the Kurzweil Virtual Printer from the available printers. The process is automated from this point forward. Kurzweil will scan the PDF, as if it was a physical paper document, and present the resulting document in a new window. Similar to the previous option, the text can then be cut and paste into a Word Processor if this is desired. It should be noted that the length of time this process takes to complete will depend on the number of pages in the PDF File being converted.

Converting on iOS (iPhone, iPad, and/or iPod Touch (:
Converting PDF Files on iOS can be divided into two sections, i.e. Converting Accessible PDF Files, and Converting Inaccessible PDF Files. The approach you need to take will be different depending on the accessibility of the PDF File.

Converting Accessible PDF Files:
The tool which I use in the case of accessible PDF Files is an iOS application, and it is simply named File Converter. The interface of this app is quite straight forward, and the conversion process is just as intuitive. If you are using a cloud storage option, as discussed in a previous post, you can import a given file to this app. Once imported, the app will work out the current file format, and it will be up to you to choose the desired format (e.g. html, txt, doc, etc.). When you begin the conversion process, you will not have to wait too long until you have a new file of your choosing. You can then opt to email the file, open it on the device, save it to the cloud, etc. It should be noted that this application is not restricted to PDF Files.

Converting Inaccessible PDF Files:
Inaccessible PDF Files can be scanned documents, images containing text, and/or an untagged PDF. On iOS an inaccessible PDF File can be opened in another application which can recognize the text present, and you can then cut and paste the text into another application. The very popular KNFB Reader will perform such recognition for you. Keep in mind that this is a secondary function of KNFB Reader, and its capabilities are much greater than recognizing PDF Files. Another application which offers similar recognition functionality is Prizmo. I have experience with Prizmo, and it is quite a good application. The primary function of both KnFB Reader and Prizmo is Optical Character Recognition (OCR), which is a much broader topic.

Those are the most effective options I have found to deal with PDF Files.

Converting PowerPoint Presentation (PPT) Files:
Another very popular file format, which is mostly accessible, is PPT. The conversion which takes place here is more for convenience instead of making an inaccessible file accessible. Again there are three options to convert a PPT to a Text File.
1. Saving as Outline.
2. Creating Handouts.
3. Saving as PDF, and using Kurzweil 1000.

Saving as Outline:
You can convert a PPT File to a Text File from within Microsoft PowerPoint without additional software. You will need to navigate to the File Menu, choose Save As and select Outline (rtf) from the File Type options. This will create a Text File which contains the text present in the original PPT File. The main titles of the presentation will be formatted as Heading 1 in the Text File, and any sub-titles, or the body of a presentation slide, will be formatted as Heading 2. I generally select all the text in the newly created Text File, and Clear All Formatting using the Styles sub-menu in Microsoft Word. It should be noted, some information on presentation files can be represented by the use of an image, and this option of conversion will not recognize such information.

Creating Handouts:
This is a conversion option that I only found out about recently, and because of this I do not have relevant experience. The procedure is similar to the one carried out in the previous conversion option. However, instead of choosing Save As, you should choose the Create Handouts option within the Save and Send tab. Once you have done this, another dialogue box should open, and you should choose Outline Only here. After selecting Ok, a new Word Document will open containing the text of the original PPT. I am unsure if this method retains tables and diagrams due to my lack of experience. Nevertheless, it is a great option for quickly extracting the text of a PPT File.

Saving to PDF, and using Kurzweil 1000:
This option may seem like a bit of a roundabout way of doing things, but it is effective none the less. Similar to the first option, the same process should be followed regarding Save As, but instead of Outline (rtf), Adobe Reader (PDF) should be chosen. This will create a PDF file which is completely accessible, and retains all information contained within tables, diagrams and/or images. Kurzweil 1000 can then be used to convert this PDF File to a Text File as discussed earlier. The benefit of this option is that all information contained within a presentation file will be recognized. I have been in situations where a slide seemed incomplete when using the first option, but using Kurzweil then allowed me to access the information presented visually.

The above information should be of benefit to anyone who encounters inaccessible PDF or PPT Files. I have used all of the above conversion options (except the Create Handouts Option), and while some are more effective than others, it is important that you are aware of the various options available so that you can improvise if necessary.

I hope the above information is of interest to you, and please get in touch if you have additional conversion options I have left out, or if you would like to ask any further questions.

The musical connection between this post’s subject matter and my personal taste is provided by Kelly Clarkson. The below video is timely considering it was announced recently that American Idol will not be returning after the next season.